Baseball position chart.  Did you ever wonder “What is a 6-4-3 double play”? Or the what the “3-4 hole” refers to? This article clarifies that sometimes mysterious baseball lingo with a diagram and descriptions of the baseball positions by number.

Which positions are represented by which numbers? Did you ever wonder “What do the numbers before a double or triple play mean?” or “What is a 6-4-3 double play”? Or the what the “3-4 hole” refers to?

There are nine numbered positions on a baseball field. The numbers are most typically used, rather than writing the player’s name or the name of the position, when keeping a scorecard.  Here is the list of baseball positions by number:

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Baseball Positions by Number

 

baseball positions by number.  PBI is free baseball tips

 

1. Pitcher (P)
2. Catcher (C)
3. 1st Base (1B)
4. 2nd Base (2B)
5. 3rd Base (3B)
6. Shortstop (SS)
7. Left Field (LF)
8. Center Field (CF)
9. Right Field (RF)
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So, as an example, a 6 4 3 double play means the shortstop fielded the ball and threw it to the second baseman, who turned the double play by throwing it to first base.

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I have been shocked to find how many charts in so-called baseball reference works get this wrong.

Just the other day, I was reading a baseball book in Barnes N Noble, and was surprised that the numbers for 2nd base and shortstop were mixed up. “This must be a typo,” I thought at first, but the mistake was repeated throughout the entire book.

Well, have no fear. Let me put to rest any doubts with the baseball position chart above.

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