1st baseman’s role and positioning for relays, cut-offs, and double cuts.

The first baseman is not the cut-off man in as many relay situations as the shortstop and second baseman. As the first baseman, you need to know when you should expect to cover the vacated second base bag, when to be in place for a relay, and when to back up a double cut. You may want to read about the basics of relays and cut-offs before proceeding with the specific scenarios on this page.  Also, click here if you are wondering “What are the numbers for baseball positions?”

1. Plays at Home Plate: Relay from right field.

cut offs and relays for baseball positioning

The first baseman is the cut-off man for plays at the plate from right field. When a ball is hit to the right fielder, run toward the catcher and get into position as quick as possible.
You want to be in a direct line from the outfielder to the catcher.

Be about 40 feet in front of the catcher and put your hands up. From this position you can see everything in front of you, so if you need to cut the ball and make a play at 2nd or 3rd, you can. It is easier to have to go toward the baseball then to retreat, that is why this starting spot may seem a little close to the catcher.

Important Note: If a play is developing at home plate and you cut the ball, you will have no shot at the runner coming home. Only cut if you have no play at home or you are going to make a play at another bag.

2. Plays at Home Plate: Relay from Center Field.

 

Baseball positioning for cutoffs and relaysAll the same applies from right field as it does center except where you position yourself. You want to be on the second base side of the pitchers mound. This will ensure that the mound will not get in your way on a short hop or if you cut the ball and make a throw. Be right at the base of the mound and let the situation dictate what your next move is.

A variation of the cut off to home plate

Most teams will use this cut off method. However a new trend that a few MLB teams are starting to trend towards is that the 3rd baseman will take cut off throws from the center fielder.

The idea behind this rotation is, if there is no possible play at 3rd base (no runner at 1st base) than the 3rd baseman will be the cut off man on a ball to the centerfielder. This is so the 1st baseman can stay at his bag and if the ball is cut off, there may be a play at 1st base if the hitter takes a large turn around the 1st base bag.

The 1st and 3rd baseman need to be in constant communication because if there is no runner at 1st, the 3rd baseman will be the cut off man on a ball hit to center.

If there is a runner at 1st and 2nd or bases loaded, than the first baseman will be the cut off man.

It can get a little confusing because most people were taught the other way.

Also in the traditional way of taking cut off throws to home plate, the second baseman should be covering first base, so if the first baseman wanted to cut the ball and get the hitter making to big of a turn around 1st base, he can.

The biggest reason I don’t entirely like this method is that when the ball is hit to center field, as the third baseman tries to get in the cut off position the runner coming around 2nd will tend to get in the way of your path. This will prevent you from getting to your spot on time.

3. Double Cuts

Relays for First Basemen: Diagram of positioning for a double cut from right field line. Play is at Home plate

Double cut, throw from right fielder, play at home plate

If you are the trail man in a double cut situationon a ball down the right field line, give the lead guy some room. Some teams do it differently, but a good rule of thumb is to stay 20 – 30 feet behind him.

It is your responsibility to make sure he is properly lined up to whichever base the throw is going to go. Talk to him and be his eyes, but remember not to be too close.
You need to get all the throws he can’t get to – high throw or low throw. Be ready in case the lead cut off man lets it go and you have to make a throw.

4. Automatic Double, Covering 2nd base.

On a ball that is an automatic double (gets past the outfielder), both of the middle infielders will be going out for a double cut and you will be covering 2nd base.

Anytime both middle infielders vacate the second base on a double cut, you should follow the runner to second base. Don’t beat the runner there, just be ready to make the out if he takes a big turn around the baseline and then tries to come back to 2nd.

The exception to this rule is an automatic double down the right field line. If this happens, and the play is at home (meaning there was a runner on 1st when the double was hit), then you will be the trail man in a double cut to home. If there was no runner on 1st, then the play is at 3rd base and you may or may not be the trail guy for the double cut to third. Teams differ on their preference for this scenario, so you’ll either be the trail guy or you’re expected to cover 2nd.

How to Cover 2nd Base

    1. Once the ball goes into the outfield, your first move is to get into the infield grass. This will get you out of the runner’s way.
    2. After he passes you follow the runner the 2nd base.
    3. If he takes a big turn around 2nd, one of the middle infielders can throw you the ball for a quick out.

Again, don’t beat the runner to 2nd base, just follow him and watch for a throw.

More Free Instruction for First Basemen:

About Author

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 13 years. Most recently, Doug signed with the Minnesota Twins in 2013, where he logged time at every infield position except 1st base in 33 Major League games. Currently Doug is with the Twins' AAA team in Rochester, NY

3 Comments

  1. hi there. I am a little league head coach and I am in a bit of an argument/discussion with one of my assistant coaches. Hoping you can help settle it. Is there ever a situation where the 1st baseman should back up the catcher at home plate? Thanks for your help.

  2. Hey, Doug.
    Your information on 1st baseman’s coverage is great, I brought up their coverage down the third base side to a high school first baseman during one of our fall ball games recently and he had no idea that he had a play past his side of the mound, as Buck Show Walter stated in a recent interview, When the ball is put into play each and every player on the defensive side of the ball has a place to go to either make the play or to back up the person making the play.
    Great Base Ball-N
    Don Ervin
    dfervin32@yahoo.com

Leave A Reply

Share.